Eco Tutorial: Recycled Book Marks

Tutorial submitted by joonbeam.
Visit the joonbeam blog.

Anyone who knows me even a smidgen knows I love thrift shops. Here’s a perfect example of a find that keeps me going back for more. It seems impossible that I, a 30+ year cookbook collector, have never run across a perfect~for~me copy of this classic. Well, on second thought, when you consider my criteria, it’s not quite as impossible to believe.
There’s always more to my stories, isn’t there?

Vintage, classic, well loved cookbooks in good condition for a reasonable price are rare. This one was $3.50. The price was right. The cover is sad, but disposable. I use my cookbooks. I don’t need the cover. Besides, the book is nice looking on its own. Although I do love that font, and the design, and all the groovy blurbs. sigh….
Wait a minute…

…My trusty paper cutter & scissors and I get to work. Before too long, I have salvaged 10 pieces of the book jacket and prepared them for the next step ~ my laminating machine.

Once laminated and trimmed, they are beautiful, preserved & useful recycled bookmarks for my wonderful new find. And wonderful it is. Check out this page: Watermelon Cocktail. Marmalade Souffle. And my favorite ~ Banana Whip. I don’t even have to make any of these to enjoy this treasure.
Look at these graphics. By the way, this is a 1964 copy of the 1959 TENTH EDITION. I couldn’t find an available copy on Amazon to compare values. But, as you can see, there is not going to be another one just like mine anyway.

Here they are. Aren’t they too wonderful for words? I love it even more now.

I’ll let you know how our recipes turn out. If you own this cookbook and have favorites, please share them with me. I’d love to know your Fannie Farmer Cookbook traditions.

This post was written by

Kate @ KnitStorm – who has written posts on Eco Etsy.

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